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to vietnam, he sent no combat troops. >> mismanaged vietnam. >> mismanaged? i don't know about that. i don't know if you have any evidence to say that. >> the diema assassination. >> well, we was aware of that, but i don't know if he was part of it. he walked us back from the brink of nuclear war, he inspired this country, inspired young people to public service and elevated the feelings about what government could do, at the same time, the famous line in the speech. he asked much of the american people. the space program, the peace corp. these are all significant achievements we remember him for today. and so, pat is right. he is frozen in time. he will always be young, he will always be popular, but he certainly shows what a president can achieve. against many odds, too. >> peace corp. was a big item. >> 39 countries, servely his most obvious legacy was creating the peace corp. it was the presidency that was a lot about image. and there are a lot of unanswered questions. would he have escalated the war in vietnam? that is really just unknown and a lot of it will never be known. it is tru
. sad to say some measures don't really care that deceit was used in passing the affordable healthcare law. i shook my head yesterday reading the "new york times" editorializing that president obama misspoke about the new law. misspoke? a dozen times? even last week he continued to misspeak. the media that desperately wants universal healthcare paid for by the healthy and working americans continues to down play the problems it is becoming quite clear that many working americans will pay more, in some cases a lot more for their healthcare insurance because co-pays and deductibles are going up. but that isn't the worst part of the new law. nor is the computer chaos. the truth is that your doctor, the person you trust may not be available to you. writing in the "wall street journal" today, edie littlefield sunday who lives in california and fighting gallbladder cancer says she may not be able to see the oncologist who has kept her alive. she writes, quote: what's happened to the president's promise you can keep your health plan? thanks to the law i have been forced to give up a world cl
and cut to the facts. we don't know at the moment what happened here, do we? >> not at all. this charge has been made, but it may not even proceed to a trial. what the police have to do now is do an investigation. we have two 911 calls that present completely different versions of what happened. the police have to do what good police do, are there any witnesses? are there any -- is there anyone who heard anything? is the inside of the house look like? are there signs of a struggle that cooperate one version or the other? about the gun -- >> see, the crucial part is this, that she says he took the gun out and waved it at her in a men innocencing way. she leaves the property to talk to the police. it's not beyond george zimmerman's brain power, because he's a smart guy to simply repack the weapon. >> okay. that's possible. >> that's possible. >> but maybe it's not even packed. this is the kind of thing that the police have to do, and, you know, the interior of that house will offer all sorts of clues. now it may be this becomes simply a he said she said and those are difficult but not imp
with the obama care. i'm not a health care expert but you don't have to be to see what's going wrong. this splan not fixable, it's not workable. why does he not realize that? why are we worried about poll numbers? this is not working. it's a disaster. why does he not acknowledge it? why are liberals marching into the white house to get a message down? why are we having nuclear talks on thursday about 51 votes? this is an emergency. i'm telling you, he would diffuse a lot of he would defuse a lot of resistance if he would admit this is the point we're at right now. >> yes, bob, answer all that -- >> first of all, for -- let me make a point he ought to go back. there are two presidents who had lower ratings and came way back up. president clinton. so that's the answer to your -- your point. in this case, you don't believe it works. eric, nobody around this table with the exception of me thinks there's probably some hope for it. obama believes it works. he thinks there's a way. >> why? >> now, you can argue the toles, the policy, and if it is impossible, obama's presidency is pretty much over. >> i
there's a sort of a code of respect among presidents, recent presidents. they don't call each other names like this. cheney, is he exempt there the rule? >> no, he's not exempt there the rule. but he made himself exempt. i don't think you'll hear george w. bush making a statement like that. but dick cheney has a different agenda. first of all, his daughter is run fog are the senate in wyoming as a tea party candidate, rather absurdly, since she's basically from the beltway. and dick cheney is trying to help her out by appealing to the tea party worst. i think that's what's going on, number one. number two i think republicans more generally, chris, have always been infuriated by the high personal standarding of president barack obama. by him sz a candidate. by him as a president. by the fact that he has seen to many of his supporters and to most americans, to be an honest, straightforward, decent guy. and this somehow is especially infuriating to republicans. it drives them crazy, and they're doing everything they can now given the opportunity to try to drag him down to their level.
of his presidency in his public life. don't forget this is a guy who ran as the change himself. he said we were the change we're waiting for. he was the change. that meant he and his own story embody the idea of community in america. and because of that, he was ideally equipped to help bring that message and reality to the middle class in america and to people struggling to get into the middle class. that was the narrative he built with david axelrod. barack obama has to run a third campaign now and recover the narrative of who he is in relation to what he wants to see happen. which is american community of which the health care plan in its best hopes he wanted it to be. to get it there is the challenge, but to explain the big surround. i think he needs his people back to run a third campaign. >> the same people? >> the same people. i would bring axelrod because because he was the guy that did a great job of helping barack obama exchange his narrative. i think that's what barack obama has to do. he has to explain what he's doing there. what is the why of it? because it's the why that's
they don't know how the suspects managed to control the victims for so long. >>> the chemist inside of a massive crime scandal in massachusetts has been sentenced to prison. annie ducan has admitted to falsifying records and led to release of hundreds of drug convicts. that's it for the headlines. america tonight is up next and remember, you can always get the latest on aljazeera.com. >> on america tonight: the journey we'll never forget. the story of president kennedy's lasting legacy and his last voyage. >> we have the transfer of power, the official of state business, going on just a few feet in front. and here we have the private horror of a widow with her murdered husband. >> also tonight, fading away, capturing what might be the last looks of a vanishing culture. >> i believe these people have a wealth, an emotional wealth, cultural wealth that we do not have any more. >> and big dreams, small space. adam may: little tread. >> it will always be my place. >> it won't get away. >> from the museum in washington, d.c. and the three shots were fired exhibit focused on the assassi
, if you don't acknowledge mistakes, anything that comes, to the public's attention that shows, that those mistakes are there, that you had to know about them, breeds cynicism, maybe you are covering something up. people start questioning everything that you say. i don't know if we're at that stage with barack obama or people are in a cynical mood about the height care law. but -- healthcare but we talk a great deal about getting to the scandals of irs. he looks and sounds angry when he is citing them, but there is no follow through. >> there is -- not only is there no follow through, people should look up a column by glen kessler in the washington post, he is an equal opportunity barber, he hands out pinnochios for misstatements, he gave president obama 4 pinnochios for his repeated statements about the fact that no american would lose their doctor or insurance plan under obamacare it is totally untrue, that is what he has to correct. that has really brought into question his credibility, he will have to take that on, and admit he misled people and apologize. neil: what would be the big d
be delusional, but they are not stupid. they understand that you don't telegraph your agendas because that turns people off. when i was young, stalin was alive, the slogan of the american communism party was -- it was not solve yet america dictatorship, take away the wealth, and distribute it to our friends. their slogan was peace, jobs, and democracy. there is a guru of the left sames saul, people are familiar with him by now, who said. there's one message of the book which is don't telegraph were agendas, lies. that is if you want to introduce a comprehensive state-run health care system otherwise known -- that's communism -- what you do is, first of all, you call it single payer, as though that's a benign thing. it's not benign if the state controls everybody's access to health care can decide what kind of health care you can get, what you can't, and knows all your financial and health information. that's a totalitarian state right there. second, don't sell it as a totalitarian system, but that you're going to insure the uninsured. you are familiar with the fact that obamacare is not going to
. [laughter] >> i don't think it works for that. >> oh, okay. >> thank you very much for coming. >> yeah. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> i think regardless where you are on the political spectrum, we are fortunate and grateful we live in the united states of america. it's a very unique place, and if america was considered to be a product, and we do try to sell our product overseas, what's our brand? i think our brand is a constitution, the rule of law, and our value system. under that brand and under that value system, there is that notion of equal under the eyes of the law, and i know that brand and value system is the ada, trying to balance the rights of americans with diabetics. >> this is a treaty. a treaty is a law. the emotional and political arguments in favor of the treaty, no one can disagree with these arguments, but the question is, will the treaty have the legal effect that's being proctored by the proponents of the treaty? we don't hear citations to the articles of the treaty. we don't hear consideration of the reports, the concluding obser
, an obama slingshot where the pulling back and off it goes. i don't see how it can get an awful lot worse. i think he may be bottoming out here. you're absolutely right about the trust factor and that it -- if you like your health plan you can keep it and period, that has done him some kind of nixonyan levels of damage. that story isn't going to last forever any more than the shutdown story lasted forever. nothing around politics seems to last forever. but how can it get worse? well, one way they could miss that end of this month deadline, which they inhe have itably will arguably, it will be possible to argue there will be people that are still having trouble. but as obama care kicks in and gradually over months, that will be a story and you'll see obama start to come up a little bit. >> it has to happen for obama to hand it off to another democrat next time. >> rick, to that point of obama care kicking in and hopefully the president coming back, another issue we're starting to hear more about again, the controversy over the requirement that health insurance companies provide access to birt
, but you won't own it forever. and i pray god when the democrats take back we don't make the kind of naked power grab you are doing. >> and yesterday they made that naked power grab. how funny is that? >> in a big way. serious too. because the complexion of our senate, the complexion of how we think about laws in this nation is potentially going to change. you go from violation of democratic principles, right, that would worsen partisanship, that it will ruin our country, that you're praying it wouldn't happen -- joe biden. but mr. president today. yesterday a huge shift so they're against it. and yesterday president obama had a revelation. listen to this. >> today's pattern of obstruction just isn't normal. it's not what our founders envisioned. a deliberate and determined effort to obstruct everything, no matter what the merits, just to refight the results of an election is not normal. and for the sake of future generations we can't let it become normal. >> here's why they say they did it yesterday. because they say the president can't get any of his nominations for the courts past this
republicans really don't like. by invoking this option, the president will be able to get things done. just look at this. right now there are eight judges on the powerful d.c. circuit court. four democrats, four republicans and three sets are open. with that split in power, the court has overturned the president's regulation on financial reform on recess appointments. most recently, a panel on the court struck down obama care's contraception mandate. but with yesterday's decision, this court will become 7-4 democratic. one of the biggest road blocks to the president's agenda will be gone. growing up in brooklyn, i learned one thing, you have to stand up to the neighborhood bully. president obama and the democrats have done just that. joining me now are melissa harris perry and susan milligan. thank you both for coming on the show. >> absolutely. >> thanks, reverend. >> melissa, let me start with you. >> yep. >> are republicans angry about this change because they've lost a tool to obstruct the president? >> i think that's right. i do think that members of the u.s. senate take very seriously
like him. i don't know. i fear the death of the medical profession. let's ask our guest. here now is dr. bill grace, also with us tonight, democratic strategist chris cofinas, heather and jim pethokoukis from the american enterprise institute. bill grace, let me start with you. are they just pricing doctors out? is this a deliberate strategy? 20 bucks a visit or -- that's crazy, absolutely crazy. >> they thought they had everything worked out on the front end of this whole deal. and you know what a disaster these turned out to be. i don't think they had any idea what they were going to do on the back end. but no one thought we were going to get more money from this. we were all thinking this was going to be -- if you remember two months ago, i said this was medicaid plus. slightly better reimbursement than medicaid. >> there's a long-term trend here. both for medicare and medicaid, to keep slicing an slicing and slicing down. hospital reimbursements, doctor reimbursements. this is part of that trend. why? why won't they reward doctors? >> basically they compare the price of physicians i
was making a suit for the first lady. >> yes. i don't remember until afterwards but my older sister tells me that it was a big topic of conversation in my house, that my father was making a suit for the first lady. >> and she wore it. she was quite pleased with it. it wasn't on this occasion only that she wore the suit. >> no, and i'm very, very happy about that. my father, from having a very faimous suit to having made a very infamous suit. i felt gratified that at least jackie got to wear the suit under happier circumstances for a period of time. because it must be really weird to have had your only claim to fame be so stained. after what happened 50 years ago today. >> yeah. did your sister recall the pride that he had in being involved in something that, at that high a level? i mean really this is the woman known even today as one of the great fashion icons of all time. he dressed her. >> yes. there was even pride after the shooting because i remember i was three years old when the assassination happened. they talked about it, but i get the sense that it was kind of a subdued way of disc
the agreement. the president if you don't want to be cynical, maybe we ought to be happy and think positively. if you hear the president, he says no deal will go into place in six months if they violate any of these. >> right. we should be totally clear about two things. one, this is not just between iran and the united states, this is an agreement between the united states and iran as well as great britain, germany, france, china, and russia. this is really a global deal. also be clear, it's not just the israelis, it's also the gulf states and saudi arabia. i'll make a third point. anyone that i've ever spoken to in the region is that iran will have one because they have the desire and they have the money to pay for it. >> when i was first listening to the breaking news on fox news channel, six month deal seems like it's reasonable because it's a short period of time. you've got intrusive inspectors going in there. the iranians have agreed to this. this is part of the six-month deal. the thing that's interesting is if after six months they haven't followed the deal, what? >> then there's no
. the reason is clear. >> the system will automatically sign them up for medicaid even if they don't want to be on medicaid. >> once you determine income level, you don't have to determine subsidies. they don't pay premiremembeprem >> which is easier than getting paying customers there the malfunctioning website. >> it's not surprising that a lot more people are willing to sign up for a free medicaid program than to sign up to pais hefty premiums for private insurance plans. >> that's one reason the administration was relying on ed cade expansion by 9 million. the supreme court said the administration didn't have the power to force states to expand medicaid. the administration tried to entice states to expand coverage offering to pay 100% of cost three years and 90% after that. >> the new law makes money available, 100% of the cost of the newly eligible people. when those sign up, there's no extra help for those folks. this is got to hit the state budgets and could hit hard. >> this miens the cost to the taxpayer is extraordinarily high. remember with medicaid there's virtually no copay,
a question. i'm sorry. >> in mika's defense, don't confusion rude with clueless. it's two things. this is pop culture. pop culture. you are proud of that. if it's way too early, it's "morning joe." i want to say as always -- drive safely. in the senate as harry read is going to lead a push to change the rules for simple up or down majority votes on all presidential nominees with one exception. also this morning, we will talk to embattled governor about the scandal that rocked his final year in office and the investigation facing him as well as the tragedy that hit his former opponent. plus, 2012's highest roller places his bets against online gambling as many look to the web as a source of new tax revenue. he signs up a bipartisan brigade to fight for his cause. is he really worried about the expansion of gambling around the country. the new documentary on the 50th anniversary of president kennedy's assassination. democrats are poised to deploy the controversial nuclear option to change the rules of the senate and clear the way for several of president obama's judicial nominees blocked by con
? >> well, i can't imagine why anyone would think that. i don't think vice presidents should come down from anything. only two officers in the land were elected by all the people, the president and the vice president i have never known any majority or senator willing to serve as vice president if his people are willing to elect him. >> nobody thought johnson was the sending most powerful man then. "life" magazine quoted the no. 2 man in washington talking about the president's brother, robert kennedy, perhaps lbj's most bitter rival in all of washington. in all of politics. of course, to call them rivals suggested in the days before fate made him president, lbj was in the same league as bobby kennedy when it came to power, clout, significance. when it came to having a political future. >> that would have been a gross distortion of the concept of a rivalry. months later safely ensconced in the white house, lbj smoke e spoke of the misery he had felt as vice president. >> i did an independent senate, the cabinet had employees under your jurisdiction here. >> all right. >> i don't think that a
by which any future majority can change the rules. democrats said they don't intend to change the rules for supreme court nominees but in two years, in four years, in six years, it's certainly a possibility at this point. >> what about the thing in the past, what made people step back was you'll be in the minority sooner or later and then it will work against you and that kind of -- why this time did the democrats say we don't care, we know it will be in the minority and will come back and haunt us at some point but right now we're going to do it. >> what's interesting in the senate and john mccain and more senior democrats and republicans, karl levin was a democrat that voted against it, said most democrats serving now don't know what life in the minority is like. 33-55 senate democrats have only known the senate in the majority. karl levin voted against it this week and said that very same thing is that you have to think of this as an institution and not just as your personal prerogative right now. to think that -- and republicans have been rather candid in saying when we take over, a
over by a dumb looking blonde. >> host: do you editorialize in your book's? >> guest: no, i don't editorialize. i think every biographer and editorialize is in what you choose to put in. and, you know, every saint has a past and every sinner has a future. i really try and be, i try and show all sides. this is why i love biography, because you were telling the history of the time and you're trying to give a nuanced, complex picture which is what most people are. >> host: few women in history you right at that the power to stop the world simply by getting married. for five years the widow of john f. kennedy had been the house object of people's admiration and overwhelming gifts. >> guest: i wrote that in 1978. we're sitting here in 2013, and i would stand by that. >> host: did you like jackie kennedy on nasa's after you are finished? >> guest: yes. i think it to go into these books, if not liking her subject, respecting your subject. and i came out of that book with real respect for this woman. she was strong and she was a great mother. and she -- i didn't realize until years and
destinos. en este episodio concluimos la historia de raquel, don fernando y los otros miembros de la familia castillo. mercedes... diles a angela, roberto, raquel y arturo que los espero en mi habitación. por supuesto, papá. raquel: don fernando... la señora suárez me dijo que rosario nunca dejó de pensar en ud.... que siempre lo amó. captioning of this program is made possible by the annenberg/cpb project and the geraldine r. dodge foundation. y de la excavación, fuimos al hospital y de ahí, vinimos para acá y fue así, don fernando, como sucedió todo. muy interesante, raquel. te agradezco la paciencia y el interés que pusiste en este caso. pero, ya es tarde. se hice de noche y tengo sueño. mañana quisiera hablar con angela y roberto para estar seguro de que son mis nietos. mercedes, ayúdame. con permiso. que sigan gozando del resto de la noche. ¿qué le estará pasando a fernando? nunca lo había visto tan desconfiado. es natural, pedro. quiere estar seguro y necesita pensarlo un poco más. claro. yo recuerdo muy bien mi reacción cuando vi por primera vez a raquel e
to do this for people and the president. i don't know why anyone would site is. at least try and help with it. instead of siding with the corporations who want to have all the edge on the security -- on the insurance companies. thank you and god bless the people. from here's kathy montgomery, texas on our republican line. caller: i have been watching yhis president obama trey slithered his way out of this. you can keep your 26-year-old on your parents plan. actually, he's going to get rid of that. next year when our employers kick us off of their plan because obama wants it this way, no one is going to be on insurance. no one's going to have insurance. he is try to push us little by little onto socialized medicine that doesn't work. our family lives in europe. it doesn't work. my nephews can't get simple surgeries that they need. it is always delayed because the government doesn't know how to run things. my advice to people who are getting kicked off the plan, pay the fine until president obama is out of office and i pray to god that our government can get together and fix this mess.
, that people were saying joseph paul franklin would suffer from this injection? >> i really don't care about it. justice was done. 33 years, they did what they did, he did the crime and trying to pay for it now. i don't care about the drug or whatever. i wish i was there, i wanted to be there, i wish i could have shot the drug up in him. >> you wish you could have done it yourself? >> i wish coy have done it myself. >> we want to change directions here. the stabbing of craigh des by his own are son. aaron alexis unsuccessfully tried to get help from the virginia and in the state senator dees his son aunt received a mental health evaluation the night before his attempted murder suicide. he was turned away we learn because the state had no beds. the claim that was denied. >> gus dedees, spied the troopers and first responders efforts he did die at the scene. >> the death of gus dees is investigated as a murder-suicide murder-suicide. state senator craigh dees was stabbed several times. >> his son, austin c. dees had an altercation at the dees residence. dees was able to leave the scene on foot an
telling them, "i just don't know if i can do this." his supposed take on bill clinton. "i like him, in doses." the splashiest claim, the obama campaign secretly did research on the possibility of replacing vice president biden with hillary clinton. >> did vice president biden know that the campaign was conducting polling and focus groups on the possibility of replacing him? >> jon, i don't know the details of that. it was something that the president would never have accepted. >> and all of this is weighing heavily on the president's poll numbers, which, george, this week, are approaching levels almost as low in the aftermath of katrina for president george bush. >>> let's begin with this book and try to clear things up, the bottom line on this potential switch between joe biden and hillary clinton, research was done, correct? >> correct. >> but what happened next? >> this was never seriously considered. never taken by the president. the president never considered this seriously. >> why was the research done? >> research is done on a lot of things. bill daley chief of staff at the
this, or i'll come after you. martha: i don't know how much leverage he will have, but, stuart, thank you very much. what will the insurance industry say about this. if you lost your plan can you call them up and say i want to keep it for one more year? we are going to talk to a former top executive at a major insurance company who knows the ins and outs of all of this. and he will give us answers to the chaos stuart talked about. we'll talk to congressman fred upton. his bill will be vote on that will allow to you keep your insurance and get that substandard plan. also the president will be -- the president talked about the plan if you couldn't keep it. senator barrasso will also be joining us. michele bachmann will be here. michele bachmann said what she wanted to do more than anything was repeal obamacare, and republicans have been called every name in the book officer trying to top this plan. gregg: senator brasplan.gregg -- gregg: what is the political fallout. not often you see an american presidenpresident tell the amern people his critics were right. >> everyone is focused on
, veteran political analyst larry sabato. it's kind of like, i don't know, deja vu all over again. the white house is capitulating. the insurance companies can do it better. this is where we started. why don't we just stay there and let the insurance companies do that? why do we need this gigantic state-run bureaucracy? >> well, the insurance companies selling obama care policies is just a stopgap. they still expect to get the exchange up and running. they're simply trying to make sure it doesn't all go kaput between now and then. secondly, the catastrophic medicare thing was a, bipartisan, b, kind of a small law. it wasn't going to discredit anybody's political career, certainly not president reagan's. so i don't think that the obama people are going to give up the ghost quite as quickly as dan rostenkowski and ronald reagan did. >> okay. maybe. so small is a relative term. larry sabato, welcome. what do you think on this? look, i know absolute outright repeal seems very unlikely. now i get that. but you have this tremendous revolt in the house, 39 democrats. you've got a simmering revoter
16,200, 16,250 in the dow before end of the month. i don't think really anything different. we did get a settlement above 16,000 yesterday. settlements are important closing prices. stuart: you've been specific and right in the past and we're holding you right there, larry. we'll check later. i want to continue this with john layfield, he knows a thing or two about investing, live from bermuda, must know what he's talking about. john, is this party going to end anytime soon for stocks? >> no, i agree with larry, i don't know about 16-2, or 16-25 by the end of the month. he's a smart guy and right about 16,000, but i do see the market continuing to trend upward because there's no place else to put your money with what miss yellen the new fed chief is going to do. continuing ben bernanke's exact claim with the fed of easy money and the buybacks, the only place to put money right now, real or artificial is the market. stuart: we hear you, john, stay right there. come back to you in a moment. some individual stocks, actually first of all, look at the dow, from the futures i thought we
's in the package? and he said, don't you remember? yesterday i told you that i would be bring something curtain rods this morning, and on thursday afternoon, when he asked me to ride home with me, i said, sure, and then a few minutes later, i asked him, lee, today is not friday. today is thursday. and he says, i know that. and then that's when he said he was -- he told me that, i'm going to go out to see marina and get some curtain rods because she had made some curtains for him, and he was going to get the curtain rods where he could hang the curtains in his room at the rooming house. >> did you ever see -- i'm sorry. did you ever see him bring that package into the depository? >> no, i did not. i did not see lee -- lee had the package with him and he walked from where the parking lot where i had to park my car. he had the package with him and he did good into the back of the depository, going up the steps of the loading dock. >> you since then, even though the warren commission talked to you later on, that had to be the rifle, but you question whether it as a rifle. didn't seem like the size
pius the x. they will kill me if i don't mention it. i remember everything about it. i remember, and everybody was crying. i went to my locker's a good friend of mine was cleaning out his locker for the weekend because the next week is thanksgiving. the odd thing is that i guess he would have to be in catholic school at the time to understand that i remember saying to my friend, he is the only catholic president he didn't live to finish out his term. that's the way we looked at it back then. i was seven when kennedy ran for president and i was so excited. it was the eighth sacrament to be for john f. kennedy and i'd passed out literature in my neighborhood about it. i remember a woman slamming the door and saying i don't support hate this. i didn't know what a papist was and i had asked my father but it was a big deal to us and there was a lot of catholic bridget is. >> host: i was seven at the time but i have a vivid memory of our principal walking into our seven -- second grade classroom. the only two things i remember after that was when i got home standing on the coffee tabl
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a couple days ago, you don't have to go back that far to a time when we were winning one or two out of every ten technology ipos. now we're winning 6 or 7 out of every 10 technology ipos, including a lot of the important ones. the wind's in our sails. no time to get complacent. >> with the nyse getting this one right, you know they're going to try to get more listings, spaulsh since this was a hyped up, anticipated ipo. >> alison kosik, thank you so much. >>> like i mentioned, back to food and this transfat news today. the fda, if they have it way, and it's likely it will, artificial transfats will be banned from the food supply in the united states. that includes your favorite cans and frozen and baked foods. here is julie schwartz. a food expert. she rushed over to tell us what it means for us right now. first, can i get a transfat 101? what does the stuff do to us if we consume it? >> transfats has been shown to be bad for our health. it's bad for our heart health. it creates high cholesterol, especially our ldl cholesterol, which is our bad cholesterol. it also makes foods reall
witness to these extraordinary things? >> i don't consider that because i've been doing this for 60 some years and covered a lot of big stories and this is just what i do. >> you were a science and aerospace reporter on the dallas morning news, you were 32 years old and you weren't covering the president's visit. you decided to go anyway to see a president in your city. when you heard the shots go out, what was your first reaction? >> you know, i don't know how fast i reacted because it was such an instantaneous bedlam there. people were crying, screaming, they were bumping into each other. i don't know how i reacted or how fast but i knew somewhere in that first minute, my journal background kicked in. it was just wild. we didn't know who was shooting, we didn't know how many were shooting and we didn't know where they were shooting from. >> now, there were three shots that you heard. you began to speak to witnesses. you grabbed a makeshift pencil and paper from a little boy and began making notes. then you heard on a police radio that a police officer had been shot, you know, not clear
oswald was the loan as s assassin? >> i don't know. >> we'll talk to kathleen kennedy townsend and patrick kennedy. >>> hello again from fox news in washington. president obama is scrambling to save obama care and just possibly his presidency. on friday he met with insurance industry executives to discuss his plan to undo cancellation of health insurance for millions of americans. joining me is head of the industry's top trade group, america's health insurance plans and from nebraska, former senator ben nelson, ceo of the national association of insurance commissioners. after the president announced his so-called fix, you put out this statement. "changing the rules after health plans have already met the requirements of the law could destabilize the market and result in higher premiums for consumers." you and other insurance executives met with the president for more than an hour on friday. did he change his mind or do you still have those concerns? >> i think it was a very good discussion all of the ceos felt that way. we had an opportunity to discuss the marketplace challenge
's all right in politics to be clever, but you don't want to look like you're trying to be clever because that looks tricky and sneaky. and, in fact, as the president continues to waive this and suspend that and exercise what he calls enforcement discretion, the american people are beginning to feel that the law is in constant flux. and if the law is in constant flux like the rules of the senate, there is no law just as there are no more rules of the senate anymore. >> is it something that the people are going to fall for? i'm picturing this time next year, it'll be right before the november elections next year. aren't the republicans going to come out and say, hey, guess what, when they do unveil the prices for the policies that are available to you under obama care in a week, guess what they're going to be. there was a reason they pushed it back until after the midterm elections. >> exactly. the people knew a month before the election, they would at least know. now they're going to have their imagination fired by republicans telling them to be afraid, be very afraid of what you're going
because of the connection with england and america and germany and crucially in japan. >> i don't think that it helps necessarily to know germany well or japan while to explain the human propensity for extreme violence. i think that we shar shared thet of horrified fascination with white people are capable of doing terrible things. i don't think -- there are people who say that you could explain this because they have and the extermination that they meant how deep it goes from hitler or the japanese that are uniquely barbaric and cruel. i don't belief that for a minute. and i think that your question is a good one. how is it that one of the most highly educated and civilized countries in europe produced so much extraordinary lives because yes it was hitler the planet it, that he couldn't have done it on his own. he had a very active participation. and i think hitler is one example and has the most extreme example in modern history that there are others on a smaller scale of the political regime that deliberately exploit peoples basic instincts and i think the idea that there is a tortur
holding each bead for dear life and i don't know maybe 20 minutes later or so she had to go out and thinthe hallway and came bad she didn't have to tell us anything. she was crying and we knew. >> do you remember that weekend at all? >> guest: i remember everything about it. we were all upset. and i went to my walkers. a good friend of mine because the next week was thanksgiving and the odd thing you have to be at catholic school at the time to understand but i remember seeing to my friend he was the only catholic elected president and he didn't live to finish out his term and that's the way that we looked at it back then. i was seven when he ran for president and i was so excited. it was the eighth sacramento bee for john f. kennedy and i passed out literature in my neighborhood. i remembered a woman slamming the door and saying i don't support a papist. i didn't know what that was that it was a big deal to us. there was a lot of anti-catholic prejudice. >> host: i was seven at the time that i have a vivid memory of our principal walking into our second grade classroom in new y
fellow guests here on your show tonight. (laughter) so i don't want to carry -- overstate the point. >> rose: of which these books were mentioned in your piece. let's begin by -- give your your sense of what it was about this man, this presidency and then we'll get into the varying opinions. i'll start with you, jeff. >> you go from the oldest president ever elected to the youngest. glamorous, apparently vigorous, with a wife who is-- and people still gasp when you remind them-- 31 years old as first lady. so the symbol of -- the torch being passed is more than rhetoric. it was in front of you everyday. and the second thing is i remember being in college-- granted, this wasn't the football team, but we would gather in front of the television set to watch his afternoon press conferences live because he was so interesting and funny and sharp. and so he made civic engagement cool for at least a wide swath of people. when you go through the failures and foibles that is beyond mythology, it was true. it was something about the that this was the leader of the united states that made a lot
think not to anticipate some trouble. i don't, really, i don't anticipate any violence. ♪ >> here comes air force number one, the president's plane now touching down. there is mrs. kennedy, and the crowd yells and the president of the united states. i can see his suntan all the way from here. >> looking at how things actually went, it wasn't just a trip to dallas. it was a political trip preparing for the 1964 elections. >> shaking hands now with the dallas people, governor and mrs. connally. governor connally on your left. >> it was whether kennedy could use his charisma and influence to get all the squabbling democrats in texas to come together before the election the next year. >> and here comes the president now, in fact, he's not in his limousine. he's departed the limousine and he is reaching across the fence, shaking hands. >> in those days everybody could get a lot closer to the president. i was standing behind mrs. kennedy and saw a hand reach through the chain link fence and break off one of the red roses. >> thousands of children swarming, trying to get over the fence. the da
in particular have to kennedy, it's really no more. it's now he's a figure in the history books. >> you don't believe that, david? >> i don't think so. if you look at larry sabito's new book quite fascinating about the legacy and influence that kennedy has had upon successive presidents since, it turns out that the man who talked about him most cited him most of finance was bill clinton. >> he worshipped him. >> even more than lyndon johnson. he has a continuing resonance. i think he really resonates with the new generation. >> absolutely. ways born after he was assassinated. my daughter identifies with him. again it's this hopefulness an this idea of youth. even though we have this young-looking president now, i think kennedy will always be that figure to us. >> we'd never seen a president like that before. he looked so stylish and young and modern. >> and his wife, i think this is another thing that keeps each generation involved in them is also who jackie was. she was so glamorous. and then she was so gangster, too. no, that was a really bold move to keep on that suit with his brains and
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